Archive for the ‘Category – Founding Fathers’ Category

Samuel Adams

Posted: April 30, 2010 in Category - Founding Fathers

Our Founding Fathers were once revered in this country as divinely inspired, courageous visionaries. Butnow, after the past 100 years of “enlightenment,” we’ve come to realize that they were nothing but old, white, racist, heathens. The “myth” of our Christian founding has been obliterated and, at best, we now know that they were no more than “deists” at best.

That’s what the progressives have had to do to the memory of those great men. Men who — while not perfect, certainly, men with flaws — were in fact, mostly Christian and nearly all believers.

In order to restore the country, we have to restore the men who founded it on certain principles to the rightful place in our national psyche.

I want to start with the man known at the time as “the father of the American Revolution,” but now has become all but forgotten.

We start with Samuel Adams. I want to tell you a story about him with the help of a man named Stephen McDowell, a historian from the Providence Foundation.

In the first two years of the War for Independence, the Americans had seen a few successes but many more defeats. If you ever get frustrated or down in your life, remember that George Washington lost every single battle he fought for over a year during the opening stages of the war.

By 1777, prospects were grim with little hope of overall victory in the war. By September, the army had been driven out of New York and New Jersey and had lost the strategic Fort Ticonderoga in upstate New York.

On September 11, Washington was defeated at the Battle of Brandywine in Delaware; Americans had 200 soldiers killed, 500 wounded and 400 captured. Keep in mind that Washington only had about 14,000 troops. With the defeat, his troops deserted and numbers fell to only 6,000.

Ten days later in Pennsylvania, another 300 soldiers were killed or wounded and 100 captured at the Paoli Massacre.

By now, only 20 members of the Continental Congress even remained together and they met to decide whether they should even continue the struggle for liberty or if it was now a lost cause.

One of those present was Samuel Adams, a delegate from Massachusetts who had been involved in the cause of independence from the beginning. In fact, he had earned the title, “Father of the American Revolution” for his leadership since even before the Stamp Act in 1765.

King George was well aware of Adams’ leadership in the rebellion, placing a bounty on his head and sending troops to capture him and kill him. In fact here is what the British order said as reported by the British officer in charge: “Our business was to seize a quantity of military stores and the bodies of Messrs. Hancock and Adams.”

Samuel Adams suffered greatly for the cause. The British virtually destroyed his home; he had to leave his family for long periods of time and he was in continual danger of capture and death.

But Adams’ faith in God and the cause of liberty were greatly needed that day in late September 1777. He spoke to his fellow congressmen, telling them “Gentlemen,” he said, “your spirits appear oppressed with the weight of the public calamities.”

He then told them that they could not show it to the American public. He told Congress: “Our affairs, it is said, are desperate! If this be our language, they are indeed. If we wear long faces, long faces will become fashionable. The eyes of the people are upon us.”

Sam Adams knew that if Congress openly showed their fear to the people, the cause of liberty would be over. He also told them, “We have proclaimed to the world our determination ‘to die freemen, rather than to live slaves’ … we have appealed to heaven for the justice of our cause, and in heaven have we placed our trust. Numerous have been the manifestations of God’s providence in sustaining us.”

Then he said, “In the gloomy period of adversity, we have had ‘our cloud by day and pillar of fire by night.’ We have been reduced to distress, and the arm of omnipotence has raised us up… Let us still rely in humble confidence on him who is mighty to save. Good tidings will soon arrive.”

His confidence and faith in God convinced them.

Adams’ statement also turned out to be prophetic, as it wasn’t long after this that one of the most significant battles in history took place — one of the seven most important battles of all time happened after that. British General John Burgoyne was defeated by colonial forces under the command of Horatio Gates at Saratoga, New York. General Washington called it a “signal stroke of Providence. The arm of Omnipotence” was evident in the victory.

Afterward, Congress approved a resolution, which included Adams’ call for a national day of “Thanksgiving.” But Sam Adams did not intend the day to be set aside for eating turkey and pie while watching football and parades. Instead, it was set aside for “solemn thanksgiving and praise.”

Here’s the way he described that praise:

“With one heart and one voice the good people may express the grateful feelings of their hearts and consecrate themselves to the service of their Divine Benefactor … and that together with their sincere acknowledgments of kind offerings they may join the penitent confession of their manifold sins, whereby they had forfeited every favor, and their humble and earnest supplication that it may please God, through the merits of Jesus Christ, mercifully to forgive and blot them out of remembrance; that it may please him graciously to afford his blessing on the Governments of these States respectively, and prosper the public councils of the whole; to inspire our commanders both by land and sea, and all under them, with that wisdom and fortitude which may render them fit instruments, under the Providence of Almighty God, to secure for these United States the greatest of all blessings: independence and peace; that it may please him to prosper the trade and manufactures of the people and the labor of the husbandman, that our land may yield its increase; to take schools and seminaries of education, so necessary for cultivating the principles of true liberty, virtue and piety, under His nurturing hand, and to prosper the means of religion for the promotion and enlargement of that kingdom which consists in righteousness, peace, and joy in the holy Ghost.”

Oh my goodness, call the ACLU. Where were the Americans United for the Separation of Church and State? The PSCS? Or the NSA, the FBI or the CIA? They were nowhere at our founding. That twisted, perverted, nonsense came over 100 years later. Check the Constitution, you’ll find no mention of it — zero.

What you will find is protection from the state for religion. Look up the Constitution of Massachusetts — a constitution that Sam Adams helped write. It is the world’s oldest constitution, still in use. Take a look at how perverted our thinking has become on this issue.

Samuel Adams was there at the beginning. There’s a reason this man is only known now for beer.

— Watch “Glenn Beck” weekdays at 5 p.m. ET on Fox News Channel

Progressives Versus The Founders

Matthew Spalding
E-mail Print

spalding.jpg“Are you serious?”

That’s how a visibly annoyed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi replied when a reporter dared ask where the Constitution grants Congress authority to require individuals to buy health insurance.

This vexed response from the House’s top Democrat last fall reveals the extent to which the intellectual, cultural and political elites have blithely abandoned the principles of America’s founding as outdated, defective and of little relevance to modern governance.

How—and why—did this come to be? The abandonment of first principles began about a hundred years ago as an intellectual project involving mostly academics and writers. It grew into a popular reform effort under the banner of “progressivism.”

Progressive thinkers sought to “re-found” America according to ideas alien to Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Hamilton and Madison. Repudiating the Founders’ belief in the existence of self-evident truths, progressives saw only relative values. Similarly, they claimed, man enjoys no permanent rights endowed by God, only changing rights held at the indulgence of government.

With no eternal truths or permanent rights, Americans must be governed by a “living” Constitution, one that endlessly evolves and grows with the times.

The progressive movement—first under a Republican president, Theodore Roosevelt, and then a Democratic one, Woodrow Wilson—set forth the platform of modern American liberalism: Progress means a form of government able to engineer a better society, assuring equal outcomes and redistributing wealth.

President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal and President Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society were grand steps toward achieving the progressive platform.

“Progressives insist the modern world is so complex and problematic that we need an activist government to manage political life and human affairs.”

And today, under President Barack Obama and the current Congress, we see a more aggressive move in this direction. Progressives insist the modern world is so complex and problematic that we need an activist government to manage political life and human affairs. This new liberalism seeks to transform our constitutional structure of limited government into an increasingly powerful, centralized government focused on social reform. The rise of the modern administrative state, the growth of bureaucracy at every level, and the host of benefits the public has come to expect from government all undercut and pervert the American idea of self-government.

More than 170 years ago, Alexis de Tocqueville warned Americans of an emerging danger to democracy: “soft despotism.” This insidious threat, the French political thinker explained, could reduce a self-governing people to “nothing more than a herd of timid and industrious animals of which the government is the shepherd.”

The danger is greater than ever. The Left is pushing America toward European-style centralization of power. Liberal panjandrums seek an even more highly regulated economy, nationalization of industries and socialized health care. Lawmakers increasingly leave the “details” of how to implement legislation to unelected bureaucrats.

This isn’t progress. It’s the revival of a failed, undemocratic and illiberal kind of statism.

“Progressive ideas have not completely won the day. And in important ways, the progressive liberals have had to adapt to realities defined by the American political tradition.”

However, the slow Europeanization of America isn’t inevitable, and it’s not too late. Progressive ideas have not completely won the day. And in important ways, the progressive liberals have had to adapt to realities defined by the American political tradition. Even so, the dominance of progressive arguments—in our schools and in the public square, as well as in our politics—has significantly weakened the very foundations of constitutionalism and limited government. That, of course, makes it all the more necessary to defend and recover the ideas of the Founders.

To flourish in the 21st century, America doesn’t need to redefine or remake itself by rejecting core principles in favor of more stylish beliefs. Rather, what’s needed is a great renewal of the foundational principles that are the true roots of American greatness.

We should focus on six priorities:

  • Educate for liberty. Public high schools tend to minimize or disparage the story of America’s founding, justifying this neglect by arguing it’s outdated and difficult to explain. Or teachers give short shrift to the principles of constitutional government and fixate on the Founders’ acknowledged flaws. It’s time the classroom again fostered understanding and appreciation of founding principles.
  • Engage the American mind. Despite constant scorn by academic elites and popular media, most Americans still believe our country is something special and respect the Founders’ ideas that make it so. Conservatives must repeatedly articulate these core principles and apply them to questions of the day, giving voice to the majority of citizens who haven’t given up on the American experiment.
  • Uphold the Constitution. Public officials take a solemn oath to support the Constitution, so they have a moral obligation to understand and abide by it. For members of Congress, this means refraining from passing bills that exceed their constitutional authority. For the president, it means rejecting unconstitutional bills and executing the law in a constitutional manner. Judges, uniquely positioned to spell out the meaning of the Constitution, must recognize they aren’t immune from its constraints.
  • Defend free markets and fiscal responsibility. Americans work hard to move their families up the economic ladder. The fruits of their labor are moral goods contributing to happiness, as are opportunities to pursue the American Dream. Yet democratic capitalism is under attack by progressives. Principled leaders must reconnect the economic arguments for liberty and prosperity with the moral case for equal opportunity, free enterprise and creativity.
  • Revive self-government. Government has assumed more and more tasks in more and more areas outside its responsibilities, greatly damaging American self-rule. When it encourages an entitlement mentality and dependency rather than self-reliance and independence, government weakens the character of the nation. Determined to impose moral neutrality, the state pushes churches and other traditional social institutions into the shadows. To strengthen the fabric of civil society, we must restore the standing and roles of those institutions.
  • Promote liberty. The United States has a special responsibility to defend the cause of liberty at home and abroad. Friends of freedom everywhere draw inspiration from our ideas and example. A confident understanding of founding principles reaffirms what Americans hold to be self-evident. Anything less would deny our birthright and undermine our moral standing in the world.
“Reclaiming America’s future will require a concerted, monumental effort to push back progressive liberalism’s assault on individual liberty and recover the Founders’ principles in our political culture.”

Thankfully, more and more Americans realize how deeply the progressive movement has transformed our politics and society. We see this in town hall meetings, “tea party” protests and recent election returns.

Taxpayers and voters are looking to the principles of the American founding. Not merely as a matter of historical curiosity, but for its philosophical grounding, practical wisdom and limitless spirit of self-government and independence.

Reclaiming America’s future will require a concerted, monumental effort to push back progressive liberalism’s assault on individual liberty and recover the Founders’ principles in our political culture. In a world of moral confusion, of arbitrary and unlimited government, the founding provides our best access to permanent truths. It’s our best ground from which to repulse the whole progressive project to remake America. It is still our rock of assurance and direction, ready to guide us to the blessings of liberty, for ourselves and our posterity.

Are we serious? Yes, Madame Speaker, we are.

Matthew Spalding, Ph.D.,  is director of the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies at The Heritage Foundation.
This article is based on portions of his book,
“We Still Hold These Truths: Rediscovering Our Principles, Reclaiming Our Future” (ISI Books).

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Similarly, they claimed, man enjoys no permanent rights endowed by God, only changing rights held at the indulgence of government.\r\nWith no eternal truths or permanent rights, Americans must be governed by a “living” Constitution, one that endlessly evolves and grows with the times.\r\nThe progressive movement—first under a Republican president, Theodore Roosevelt, and then a Democratic one, Woodrow Wilson—set forth the platform of modern American liberalism: Progress means a form of government able to engineer a better society, assuring equal outcomes and redistributing wealth.\r\nPresident Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal and President Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society were grand steps toward achieving the progressive platform.\r\n\r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n \"Progressives insist the modern world is so complex and problematic that we need an activist government to manage political life and human affairs.\"\r\n \r\n \r\nAnd today, under President Barack Obama and the current Congress, we see a more aggressive move in this direction. Progressives insist the modern world is so complex and problematic that we need an activist government to manage political life and human affairs.\r\nThis new liberalism seeks to transform our constitutional structure of limited government into an increasingly powerful, centralized government focused on social reform. The rise of the modern administrative state, the growth of bureaucracy at every level, and the host of benefits the public has come to expect from government all undercut and pervert the American idea of self-government.\r\nMore than 170 years ago, Alexis de Tocqueville warned Americans of an emerging danger to democracy: “soft despotism.” This insidious threat, the French political thinker explained, could reduce a self-governing people to “nothing more than a herd of timid and industrious animals of which the government is the shepherd.”\r\nThe danger is greater than ever. The Left is pushing America toward European-style centralization of power. Liberal panjandrums seek an even more highly regulated economy, nationalization of industries and socialized health care. Lawmakers increasingly leave the “details” of how to implement legislation to unelected bureaucrats. \r\nThis isn’t progress. It’s the revival of a failed, undemocratic and illiberal kind of statism.\r\n\r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n \"Progressive ideas have not completely won the day. And in important ways, the progressive liberals have had to adapt to realities defined by the American political tradition.\"\r\n \r\n \r\nHowever, the slow Europeanization of America isn’t inevitable, and it’s not too late. Progressive ideas have not completely won the day. And in important ways, the progressive liberals have had to adapt to realities defined by the American political tradition.\r\nEven so, the dominance of progressive arguments—in our schools and in the public square, as well as in our politics—has significantly weakened the very foundations of constitutionalism and limited government. That, of course, makes it all the more necessary to defend and recover the ideas of the Founders.\r\nTo flourish in the 21st century, America doesn’t need to redefine or remake itself by rejecting core principles in favor of more stylish beliefs. Rather, what’s needed is a great renewal of the foundational principles that are the true roots of American greatness.\r\nWe should focus on six priorities:\r\n\r\n \r\n Educate for liberty. Public high schools tend to minimize or disparage the story of America’s founding, justifying this neglect by arguing it’s outdated and difficult to explain. Or teachers give short shrift to the principles of constitutional government and fixate on the Founders’ acknowledged flaws. It’s time the classroom again fostered understanding and appreciation of founding principles.\r\n \r\n Engage the American mind. Despite constant scorn by academic elites and popular media, most Americans still believe our country is something special and respect the Founders’ ideas that make it so. Conservatives must repeatedly articulate these core principles and apply them to questions of the day, giving voice to the majority of citizens who haven’t given up on the American experiment.\r\n \r\n Uphold the Constitution. Public officials take a solemn oath to support the Constitution, so they have a moral obligation to understand and abide by it. For members of Congress, this means refraining from passing bills that exceed their constitutional authority. For the president, it means rejecting unconstitutional bills and executing the law in a constitutional manner. Judges, uniquely positioned to spell out the meaning of the Constitution, must recognize they aren’t immune from its constraints.\r\n \r\n Defend free markets and fiscal responsibility. Americans work hard to move their families up the economic ladder. The fruits of their labor are moral goods contributing to happiness, as are opportunities to pursue the American Dream. Yet democratic capitalism is under attack by progressives. Principled leaders must reconnect the economic arguments for liberty and prosperity with the moral case for equal opportunity, free enterprise and creativity.\r\n \r\n Revive self-government. Government has assumed more and more tasks in more and more areas outside its responsibilities, greatly damaging American self-rule. When it encourages an entitlement mentality and dependency rather than self-reliance and independence, government weakens the character of the nation. Determined to impose moral neutrality, the state pushes churches and other traditional social institutions into the shadows. To strengthen the fabric of civil society, we must restore the standing and roles of those institutions.\r\n \r\n Promote liberty. The United States has a special responsibility to defend the cause of liberty at home and abroad. Friends of freedom everywhere draw inspiration from our ideas and example. A confident understanding of founding principles reaffirms what Americans hold to be self-evident. Anything less would deny our birthright and undermine our moral standing in the world.\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n \"Reclaiming America’s future will require a concerted, monumental effort to push back progressive liberalism’s assault on individual liberty and recover the Founders’ principles in our political culture.\"\r\n \r\n \r\n\r\nThankfully, more and more Americans realize how deeply the progressive movement has transformed our politics and society. We see this in town hall meetings, “tea party” protests and recent election returns.\r\nTaxpayers and voters are looking to the principles of the American founding. Not merely as a matter of historical curiosity, but for its philosophical grounding, practical wisdom and limitless spirit of self-government and independence. Reclaiming America’s future will require a concerted, monumental effort to push back progressive liberalism’s assault on individual liberty and recover the Founders’ principles in our political culture.\r\nIn a world of moral confusion, of arbitrary and unlimited government, the founding provides our best access to permanent truths. It’s our best ground from which to repulse the whole progressive project to remake America. It is still our rock of assurance and direction, ready to guide us to the blessings of liberty, for ourselves and our posterity.\r\nAre we serious? Yes, Madame Speaker, we are.\r\n Matthew Spalding, Ph.D.,  is director of the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies at The Heritage Foundation.\r\n This article is based on portions of his book, “We Still Hold These Truths: Rediscovering Our Principles, Reclaiming Our Future” (ISI Books).\r\n ",
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Source: Renewing American Leadership

FOUNDING FATHERS OF OUR NEW COUNTRY
by James Quinn
September 29, 2009

“Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”George Washington

“I hope I shall possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an honest man.” – George Washington

“Truth will ultimately prevail where there is pains to bring it to light.” – George Washington

The Great American Republic was shaped by individual events which are now part of American legend. The Battle of Bunker Hill, The Winter at Valley Forge, Washington Crossing the Delaware, the Constitutional Convention, and George Washington stepping aside after his 2nd term as President, evoke pride and honor in the hearts of many Americans, if their public schools still teach about these historic events. The politically correct “history” books today are more likely to concentrate on the impact of Marilyn Monroe on the culture of America. The Founding Fathers, including James Madison, Samuel Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, John Jay, Benjamin Franklin, and George Washington, risked their lives to create a republic. These revolutionaries declared their independence from an overbearing oppressive regime. The British Empire had been taxing the colonies to pay for their foreign adventures. The Founding Fathers were willing to risk being hung rather than live under tyranny, when they made the following declaration:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

After risking their lives and fighting an eight year War for Independence against the most powerful military on earth, they came together and drafted the greatest governing document ever conceived. The U.S. Constitution and its Amendments struck the perfect balance, as it constrained the Federal government and allowed its citizens maximum freedom. It was designed to prevent the concentration of power by the Executive branch. Power was balanced between the three branches of government and jurisdiction was delegated to the States. Governance was placed in the hands of the people. This sublime document has served as our guide for over two centuries. Since the early 20th Century, America has gradually allowed this document to become tarnished and trivialized.

James Madison was the architect of this brilliant inspirational document in 1787. It is a remarkably concise document. The Constitution consisted of a preamble, seven original articles and the Bill of Rights. The beauty of this document is its clarity and brevity. An 81 year old Benjamin Franklin, whose health was rapidly failing but whose mind was as luminous as ever, on the last day of the Constitutional Convention urged passage of the Constitution with the following words of wisdom:

“ In these sentiments, Sir, I agree to this Constitution with all its faults, if they are such; because I think a general Government necessary for us, and there is no form of Government but what may be a blessing to the people if well administered, and believe farther that this is likely to be well administered for a course of years, and can only end in Despotism, as other forms have done before it, when the people shall become so corrupted as to need despotic Government, being incapable of any other. I doubt too whether any other Convention we can obtain, may be able to make a better Constitution.

Much of the strength & efficiency of any Government in procuring and securing happiness to the people depends, on opinion, on the general opinion of the goodness of the Government, as well as of the wisdom and integrity of its Governors. I hope therefore that for our own sakes as a part of the people, and for the sake of posterity, we shall act heartily and unanimously in recommending this Constitution (if approved by Congress & confirmed by the Conventions) wherever our influence may extend, and turn our future thoughts & endeavors to the means of having it well administered.

On the whole, Sir, I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the Convention who may still have objections to it, would with me, on this occasion doubt a little of his own infallibility, and to make manifest our unanimity, put his name to this instrument.”

Mr. Franklin in his plea to those attending the Convention also issued a warning which we have not heeded. A Constitution is only as good as the people who administer it. If the people become corrupted, the government will become corrupted, and the Constitution will become a worthless piece of paper. The wisdom and integrity of the governors of the Constitution are the strength that makes the document so powerful. The American people have failed to take note of Benjamin Franklin’s warning. We have allowed our desire for material goods, acceptance of easy wrong solutions to complicated problems, putting our selfish short term desires ahead of the long-term needs of the country, and meddling in foreign lands, to corrupt our government and its leaders. Wisdom and integrity are rare traits in government officials today. They were plentiful during the American Revolution. These traits defined George Washington, the father of our country. These traits also define the U.S. Representative from Texas, Ron Paul.

A Noble Experiment – A Noble Leader

The ruling elite, backed by the powerful banking cartel, who control the political reins, the mainstream media, the military industrial complex, and the foreign policy of the United States, have trampled on the U.S. Constitution. They take every opportunity to denigrate its principles, call it an antiquated document meant for a simpler time, and scorn and ridicule those who risked their lives to write this noble governing document. The mainstream media attempts to protect its liberal agenda by disparaging the Boston Tea Party, Patriots, and the Founding Fathers. Millions of dazed and confused Americans know nothing about George Washington other than his face is on the dollars they use to buy Snuggies or fried Twinkies. They think his chief claim to fame is cutting down a cherry tree. The maligning of the Constitution and belittling of the men who created it, is part of the plan to retain and increase their power and control over the American people. If the broad swath of Americans decided to reinstitute the founding principles of the Constitution, the existing power structure would come crashing down in a heap of smoldering ashes. A Second American Revolution is brewing. The anger and rage of thinking Americans is palpable. The only question is whether this Second American Revolution will be peaceful or bloody. The Founding Fathers proved that an irate tireless minority can win.

George Washington is not a hollow, vacuous, meaningless symbol of a far simpler time. George Washington was a man of unquestioned integrity, tremendous leadership skills, true humbleness, and love of his country. He was truly the Father of our Nation. Henry Lee, in his eulogy of George Washington, captured the true spirit of the man:

First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen, he was second to none in humble and enduring scenes of private life. Pious, just, humane, temperate, and sincere; uniform, dignified, and commanding; his example was as edifying to all around him as were the effects of that example lasting…Correct throughout, vice shuddered in his presence and virtue always felt his fostering hand. The purity of his private character gave effulgence to his public virtues…Such was the man for whom our nation mourns.”

George Washington was born in 1732 in the British colony of Virginia to aristocratic parents. He could have lived a life of leisure on his plantation. Instead he chose a life of service to his country. He never involved himself in politics. He was a self taught surveyor and soldier. He did his duty on behalf of the British monarchy during the French and Indian War. He was living an aristocratic lifestyle in Virginia during the 1760’s when the British Parliament began passing its series of unfair tax acts (Stamp Act, Townshend Acts, Intolerable Acts). This imperious stomping on the rights and liberties of American colonists, led Washington to attend the 1st Continental Congress in 1774. After the opening shot was fired at Lexington & Concord, Washington arrived at the 2nd Continental Congress in military uniform. He was ready to risk his life and serve his country. The Continental Congress appointed him commander in chief of the Continental Army. He held this position for the next eight years of trial and tribulation.

A lesser man would have balked at such an overwhelming life threatening task. Instead, he rode to Boston and assumed command of an undisciplined army of citizen farmers. He led this army through dark days and against insurmountable odds, outmaneuvering, outthinking, and ultimately defeating the vaunted British Regulars and the most powerful Navy on the face of the earth. Despite the lack of troops, lack of training, lack of ammunition, lack of food, lack of supplies and lack of support from the states, George Washington never lost his faith in his troops, his righteous cause of liberty or himself. The two events that embody all of the noble characteristics of Washington and the fledgling Republic were Washington crossing the Delaware to attack Trenton on Christmas night in 1776 and the winter at Valley Forge.

After losing a number of skirmishes with the British in New York and retreating into New Jersey, the morale of Washington’s army was at a low point. Soldiers were deserting and re-enlistments were declining. The weather was dreadful and even Washington feared the end of the revolution was at hand. The future of the fledgling country hung in the balance. On the night of December 25, 1776 General Washington and 2,400 troops set out on their rendezvous with destiny. General Washington’s password for the surprise attack on Trenton was Victory or Death. No words could have been truer. If Washington’s surprise attack failed, the war was lost. The boldness, audacity and brilliance of Washington’s plan was representative of the spirit and daring of the Patriots in there desperate struggle for independence. Crossing the ice clogged Delaware River in small wooden row boats in the middle of the night during an ice storm while two supporting groups failed to get across the river was a feat in itself. He then led his troops on a 9 mile march to Trenton. They attacked the Hessians and captured 1,000 out of the 1,500 man garrison. This victory over Regulars in the British Army rejuvenated the revolution. Washington followed this victory with another at Princeton. The Revolution had been in doubt only a week earlier, and the army was on the verge of collapse. With this bold victory, soldiers agreed to stay and new recruits came and joined the ranks.

One year later after losing battles at Brandywine and Germantown, Washington abandoned Philadelphia and retreated to Valley Forge in December 1777 with his weary, ill-fed, ill-clothed, ill-equipped and ill-trained army of 12,000 citizen soldiers.  Undernourished and lacking boots and uniforms, living in cramped, damp quarters, the army was devastated by illness and disease. Typhoid, jaundice, dysentery, and pneumonia were among the assassins that felled 2,000 men that winter. Washington voiced his despair in letter that winter:

“that unless some great and capital change suddenly takes place … this Army must inevitably … Starve, dissolve, or disperse, in order to obtain subsistence in the best manner they can.”

Adequate clothing was scarce. Long marches had destroyed boots. Blankets were in short supply. Tattered uniforms were rarely replaced. At one point these deficiencies led 4,000 men to be listed as unfit for duty. A lesser man and citizen soldiers who cared more for their own farmsteads than their country, would have abandoned this seemingly forlorn cause. Instead, Washington and his dedicated patriot soldiers used the next six months to become a true army. Baron von Steuben, a onetime member of the staff of Frederick the Great in the Prussian Army, volunteered to help General Washington turn his men into an army. And this he did. From dawn to dusk his familiar voice was heard in camp above the sounds of marching men and shouted commands. Soon companies, regiments then brigades moved smartly from line to column, column to line and loaded muskets with precision. In June 1778 Washington’s Army departed Valley Forge as a cohesive unit ready for five more years of war. These men had forged a fresh spirit towards the birth of a new Republic. They had conquered the weather, doubt, and lack of training through sheer force of will, hard work, dedication and willingness to sacrifice, all for the good of a nation.

After the final victory in 1783, Washington could have become the King of America. Instead he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief and retired to Mount Vernon, reflecting his view that the new government should be a citizen government. He was persuaded to come out of retirement and preside over the Constitutional Convention as its president. His congenial personality and stature as a hero kept the delegates focused on the task. The delegates created the Presidency with him in mind and would allow him to define the office. His support of the Constitution convinced the Virginia legislature and many others to support ratification. Washington was unanimously elected President in 1789 and 1792 by the Electoral College, despite not seeking the position. President Washington proved a highly proficient administrator. A first rate delegator and evaluator of aptitude and moral fiber, he held regular cabinet meetings to deliberate issues before making a final decision. In handling everyday tasks, he was “systematic, orderly, energetic, solicitous of the opinion of others but decisive, intent upon general goals and the consistency of particular actions with them”, according to historian Leonard White. He planned to retire after his 1st term but the growing divisions between the newly formed Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties, along with the current state of foreign affairs, would tear the country apart in the absence of his leadership and convinced him to serve a 2nd term. He refused to serve a 3rd term, retiring again to Mount Vernon, dying two years later at the age of 67.

This wise, larger than life man was more than a myth. He was genuine human being whose tremendous attributes founded our great Republic. He deserves the utmost praise and respect for his continuous 45 years of dedicated service in creating a nation of and for the people. His writings, speeches and Farewell Address clearly reflect his belief in the Constitution and the American people.

The Constitution is the guide which I never will abandon. – George Washington

The basis of our political system is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. – George Washington

Foreign Policy

The Constitution of the United States of America clearly delineated the powers between the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial branches. Regarding foreign intervention, Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution is clear regarding Congress’ responsibility:

  • To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;
  • To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years;
  • To provide and maintain a Navy;
  • To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;
  • To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;
  • To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;

George Washington was a military hero who, as President, preached non-interventionism, free trade, and the danger of a too powerful military. He did so because he rightly knew that foreign entanglements would be detrimental to the people. His Farewell Address to the American people couldn’t have been clearer.

“Observe good faith and justice towards all Nations; cultivate peace and harmony with all. In the execution of such a plan, nothing is more essential than that permanent, inveterate antipathies against particular Nations, and passionate attachments for others, should be excluded; and that, in place of them, just and amicable feelings towards all should be cultivated.

Sympathy for the favorite Nation, facilitating the illusion of an imaginary common interest, in cases where no real common interest exists, and infusing into one the enmities of the other, betrays the former into a participation in the quarrels and wars of the latter, without adequate inducement or justification.

As avenues to foreign influence in innumerable ways, such attachments are particularly alarming to the truly enlightened and independent Patriot. How many opportunities do they afford to tamper with domestic factions, to practice the arts of seduction, to mislead public opinion, to influence or awe the Public Councils! Such an attachment of a small or weak, towards a great and powerful nation, dooms the former to be the satellite of the latter.

The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations, is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements, let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here let us stop. Harmony, liberal intercourse with all nations, are recommended by policy, humanity, and interest. But even our commercial policy should hold an equal and impartial hand; neither seeking nor granting exclusive favors or preferences; consulting the natural course of things; diffusing and diversifying by gentle means the streams of commerce, but forcing nothing.”

The Constitution is crystal clear. President Washington was crystal clear. Our country has not heeded the requirements of the Constitution or the wisdom of our greatest President. The United States has troops stationed in 130 countries throughout the world. The United States’ direct military spending in excess of $700 billion per year constitutes 48% of all the military spending in the world. Essentially, the United States spends as much as the rest of the world combined. The U.S. spends another $300 billion per year on costs related to prior wars and the interest on the debt incurred to conduct those wars.

The U.S. military has 1.5 million active personnel and another 1.5 million reserve personnel. The U.S. Navy has 280 ships and 3,700 aircraft. The U.S. Air Force has 5,573 aircraft, 446 ICBMs, and 32 satellites. The U.S. Army has 7,851 M1 Abrams tanks, 6,724 Bradley fighting vehicles, 15,000 armored personnel carriers, 80,000 HUMVEEs, 1,300 attack helicopters, 3,000 other helicopters, and a few other miscellaneous odds and ends. The U.S. Marine Corp has thousands of vehicles and aircraft to fulfill their mission. Does this force seem adequate to protect the United States from attack by Iran, Afghanistan or North Korea? The U.S. military is clearly a BIG hammer. When you are a BIG hammer, everything looks like a nail. Former supreme commander of the military and President of the U.S. George Washington, had this to say about overgrown military establishments:

“Overgrown military establishments are under any form of government inauspicious to liberty, and are to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty.”

Another former general, Dwight D. Eisenhower, in his own Presidential Farewell Address warned of the implications of the military industrial complex:

This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence — economic, political, even spiritual — is felt in every city, every State house, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.”

The military industrial complex is stronger, more insidious, more powerful, and more dangerous than any time in our 220 year history. The defense industry lobbyists bribe Congress with contributions to their political campaigns and reward them with lucrative jobs when they leave government “service”, in return for billions in weapons contracts. Our best and brightest technical minds are focused on producing technology to kill people more efficiently. In the meantime, our bridges collapse into rivers, our water pipes burst, and our energy infrastructure rusts away. Only Congressman Ron Paul, who has not been bought by the defense industry, has been brave enough to speak the truth:

“War is never economically beneficial except for those in position to profit from war expenditures.”

Only the defense industry and their bought politicians profit from the $1 trillion that the U.S. borrows from the Chinese to fund our foreign intervention policies. Is it possible that those within the defense industry promote instability and war throughout the world? That couldn’t be possible, because they have noble intentions, just like the citizen soldiers at Valley Forge. The fact is that the United States is the most powerful country in the history of the world. If Defense spending was cut by $500 billion, we would still be the most powerful country in the history of the world. Ron Paul put it quite succinctly in 2007:

“There’s nobody in this world that could possibly attack us today… I mean, we could defend this country with a few good submarines. If anybody dared touch us we could wipe any country off of the face of the earth within hours. And here we are, so intimidated and so insecure and we’re acting like such bullies that we have to attack third-world nations that have no military and have no weapon.”

Of course, the politicians occupying the halls of Congress for the last 50 years have completely ignored their Constitutional obligation to declare war before sending American troops into harm’s way. George Washington knew the danger of committing American troops without proper authorization:

“The constitution vests the power of declaring war in Congress; therefore no offensive expedition of importance can be undertaken until after they shall have deliberated upon the subject and authorized such a measure.”

The last time that the U.S. Congress carried out its Constitutional obligation and declared war was World War II. There have been 50 major combat operations since World War II where Americans have been sent into battle with no declaration of war. This is a compete flaunting of the U.S. Constitution.

“The moral and constitutional obligations of our representatives in Washington are to protect our liberty, not coddle the world, precipitating no-win wars, while bringing bankruptcy and economic turmoil to our people.” – Ron Paul

As I watched the disgraceful Republican Presidential primaries during 2008, I wondered what had happened to the conservative Republican Party. It had been hijacked by the neoconservatives. These people are as far from conservative as you can get. Their agenda is to aggressively use American economic and military power to bring liberalism and democracy to foreign countries, whether they like it or not. Ron Paul was the only candidate to stand for the true principles of the Republican Party. He pointed out that the Republican Party had been non-interventionist throughout the 20th Century and as recently as the year 2000, it was still the hallmark of the party:

“Throughout the 20th century, the Republican Party benefited from a non-interventionist foreign policy. Think of how Eisenhower came in to stop the Korean War. Think of how Nixon was elected to stop the mess in Vietnam. How did we win the election in the year 2000? We talked about a humble foreign policy: No nation-building; don’t police the world. That’s conservative, it’s Republican, it’s pro-American – it follows the founding fathers. And, besides, it follows the Constitution.”

As I watched the kindergarten military experts Guliani, Romney, and Huckabee scornfully lecture Ron Paul on American foreign policy, I was taken aback by their utter hypocrisy and lack of Constitutional knowledge. Three men who never spent one second in the U.S. military, even though two were in their twenties during the Vietnam War, lecturing a man who served in the U.S. Air Force from 1962 through 1968 as a flight surgeon. These men join the other neo-cons that avoided service in Vietnam, George Bush and Dick Cheney (applied for 5 draft deferments) in the neo-con hall of shame. The military “hero”, John McCain, was disdainful towards Mr. Paul’s contention that the invasion of Iraq was unconstitutional. McCain’s impeccable military record of graduating 894th out of 899 at the Naval Academy, crashing 3 planes, being shot down over Hanoi, and cracking under torture by the North Vietnamese, certainly qualified him as an expert in casting aside the Constitution forged by George Washington and true patriots. Ron Paul was the only true conservative Republican, in the spirit of Ronald Reagan, on that stage.

Legitimate use of violence can only be that which is required in self-defense.” – Ron Paul

“History teaches that war begins when governments believe the price of aggression is cheap.” – Ronald Reagan

Civil Liberties

George Washington warned against the usurpation of civil liberties by those seeking power in his Farewell Address:

“However combinations or associations of the above description may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely, in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people, and to usurp for themselves the reins of government; destroying afterwards the very engines, which have lifted them to unjust dominion.

It is important, likewise, that the habits of thinking in a free country should inspire caution, in those entrusted with its administration, to confine themselves within their respective constitutional spheres, avoiding in the exercise of the powers of one department to encroach upon another. The spirit of encroachment tends to consolidate the powers of all the departments in one, and thus to create, whatever the form of government, a real despotism. A just estimate of that love of power, and proneness to abuse it, which predominates in the human heart, is sufficient to satisfy us of the truth of this position. The necessity of reciprocal checks in the exercise of political power, by dividing and distributing it into different depositories, and constituting each the Guardian of the Public Weal against invasions by the others, has been evinced by experiments ancient and modern; some of them in our country and under our own eyes. To preserve them must be as necessary as to institute them.”

The Constitution addressed the civil liberties of citizens in the Bill of Rights:

First Amendment - Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Second Amendment - A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Fourth Amendment - The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Tenth Amendment - The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Americans have chosen to trade their civil liberties for the safety and security of a military welfare state. We have allowed the Federal government to overtake a vast slice of our lives. Between financial bailouts and the economic stimulus program, Federal government spending accounts for 26% of the nation’s economy. The government is financing 9 out of 10 new mortgages in the United States. If you buy a car from General Motors, you are buying from a company that is 60% owned by the government. Politicians are now trying to swell their power over all citizens by taking over the healthcare system after seizing control of the banking system in the last year. The liberal media ridicules and scorns the Americans who have been exercising their First Amendment right to peaceably assemble and protest this overreach of government. Liberal biased commentators condemn the citizens speaking out at town hall meetings. Left wing politicians spew lies about potential violence and racism against Obama coming from these angry American citizens. Right wing neo-con commentators like Sean Hannity try to latch onto the protests, even though most of the protestors would spit in his face if they could. The agendas of the extreme left and extreme right both infringe upon the civil liberties of American citizens. If our freedom of speech and freedom of expression in print and on the internet are taken away, a totalitarian state is not far behind.

“If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.” – George Washington

“All initiation of force is a violation of someone else’s rights, whether initiated by an individual or the state, for the benefit of an individual or group of individuals, even if it’s supposed to be for the benefit of another individual or group of individuals.”Ron Paul

Those who control the reins of power do not trust the citizens. They want to easily manipulate the sedated masses with their message using their controlled corporate mass media. Having taken over the public school system decades ago, government has worked its magic and graduates millions of functionally illiterate drones into society every year. More than 50% of these morons don’t know that George Washington was the 1st President of the United States and is the guy on the quarters jingling in their pocket. The ignorance of a huge portion of the American population has resulted in a decline of freedom and liberty over time.

“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.” – Thomas Jefferson

When the government starts to infringe upon the citizen’s Second Amendment rights, the time will be nearing for a Second American Revolution. There are now shortages of guns and ammunition in the U.S. Two thirds of the public believe that Obama will restrict gun ownership. He has stated that intention. The Second Amendment is very clear, but Obama will interpret it any way he chooses because he is in power. The Nazis imposed strict gun control measures shortly after Hitler came to power. The lambs complied. We all know what happened next. In the first chapter of his book, Freedom Under Siege, Ron Paul argued that the purpose of the Second Amendment is to place a check on government tyranny, not to merely grant hunting rights or allow self defense. When forced to choose between the wisdom of George Washington and Barack Hussein Obama, I think it is an easy choice. Who uses the weasel words?

“Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples’ liberty’s teeth.” – George Washington

“As a general principle, I believe that the Constitution confers an individual right to bear arms. But just because you have an individual right does not mean that the state or local government can’t constrain the exercise of that right, in the same way that we have a right to private property but local governments can establish zoning ordinances that determine how you can use it.” – Barack Obama

The neo-cons who dominated the administration of George W. Bush seized the 9/11 terrorist attack as a once in a lifetime opportunity to change the world. In doing so, they have used fear, visions of mushroom clouds, and promises of protection and safety to convince the American people to give up their few remaining civil liberties. The Patriot Act was rammed down our throats in the months following 9/11. Anyone who would vote against such a bill was branded un-patriotic. It passed the Senate by a vote of 98 to 1. It passed the House by 357 to 66. Only 3 Republicans voted against The Patriot Act. Three Republicans had the courage to stand up for the Constitution. Ron Paul, from Texas, was one of them. His belief cannot be any clearer:

“Everything we have done in response to the 9-11 attacks, from the Patriot Act to the war in Iraq, has reduced freedom in America.”

The role of government is to protect American citizens’ privacy, not violate it. Since 9/11 all American citizens are considered suspect until proven otherwise by some bureaucratic thug in the Department of Homeland Security. The Eye (think Mordor) of the U.S. government is focused inwards towards its own citizens under the guise of protecting us from unknown bogeymen terrorists. We are no safer, with less freedom, and buried under more debt. Mr. Paul’s reasoning and adherence to the Constitution of the United States is so sane that it seems insane to the criminals running our asylum (aka government) today. We live in a bizzaro world where doing the opposite of what we should be doing is considered the right thing to do. Liberty is not some antiquated concept in the ether of history. Liberty is freedom from arbitrary or despotic control, allowing for the enjoyment of social, economic, and political rights and privileges. President Washington and Representative Paul seem to be reading from the same Constitution.

“Arbitrary power is most easily established on the ruins of liberty abused to licentiousness. It will be found an unjust and unwise jealousy to deprive a man of his natural liberty upon the supposition he may abuse it.” – George Washington

“Our country’s founders cherished liberty, not democracy.” – Ron Paul

Economics

Amazingly, after reading George Washington’s (home schooled and suffering from really bad teeth) advice regarding the use of public debt, I think he would have made a better Federal Reserve Chairman than Helicopter Ben Bernanke, with his BA from Harvard and PhD from MIT, and perfect teeth. This military man, in his Farwell Address to the American people, advised the country to cultivate peace with all countries, therefore not incurring debt to fight wars. Surpluses should be built up in times of peace in order to pay the costs of unavoidable wars (not pre-emptive wars of aggression). Our representatives are responsible for the proper fiscal management of the country, but the public must be vigilant in policing the representatives. Washington saw taxes as an unpleasant but necessary evil. The way to keep taxes low was to keep spending under control. With our $11.9 TRILLION National Debt and 67,000 page IRS tax code, I think we have gone slightly off track.

“As a very important source of strength and security, cherish public credit. One method of preserving it is, to use it as sparingly as possible; avoiding occasions of expense by cultivating peace, but remembering also that timely disbursements to prepare for danger frequently prevent much greater disbursements to repel it; avoiding likewise the accumulation of debt, not only by shunning occasions of expense, but by vigorous exertions in time of peace to discharge the debts, which unavoidable wars may have occasioned, not ungenerously throwing upon posterity the burthen, which we ourselves ought to bear. The execution of these maxims belongs to your representatives, but it is necessary that public opinion should cooperate.

To facilitate to them the performance of their duty, it is essential that you should practically bear in mind, that towards the payment of debts there must be Revenue; that to have Revenue there must be taxes; that no taxes can be devised, which are not more or less inconvenient and unpleasant; that the intrinsic embarrassment, inseparable from the selection of the proper objects (which is always a choice of difficulties), ought to be a decisive motive for a candid construction of the conduct of the government in making it, and for a spirit of acquiescence in the measures for obtaining revenue, which the public exigencies may at any time dictate.”

Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution clearly states the obligations and duties of the U.S. Congress:

  • The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defense and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;
  • To borrow money on the credit of the United States;
  • To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures;

Congress has done a phenomenal job in taxing, spending and borrowing. Nobody does it better. They should get a Congressional gold medal for taxing, spending and borrowing. Up until 1913, the government was limited in their ability to spend because there was no personal income tax and the currency of the United States was backed by hard assets. Woodrow Wilson and Congressmen, under the control of the banking cartel, created the Federal Reserve and the personal income tax in 1913. The unleashing of politicians from any constraints on their spending has led to a predictable result. The US dollar has lost 97% of its value versus gold since 1913. The U.S. National Debt was $2.9 billion in 1913. Today, it is $11.9 TRILLION, a mere 400,000% increase in 96 years. That is the good news. President Obama plans to add at least another $9 TRILLION to our debt in the next 10 years. That is the actual plan. Can you picture George Washington spinning in his grave?

“When the federal government spends more each year than it collects in tax revenues, it has three choices: It can raise taxes, print money, or borrow money. While these actions may benefit politicians, all three options are bad for average Americans.” – Ron Paul

“Deficits mean future tax increases, pure and simple. Deficit spending should be viewed as a tax on future generations, and politicians who create deficits should be exposed as tax hikers.” – Ron Paul

There goes that crazy Ron Paul again stirring up trouble. Doesn’t this guy realize that if we adhered to sound money policies, had a hard asset backed currency, and spent only as much as we brought in, the existing political structure and its corporate, banker, and military backers would collapse? This would cause turmoil and heartache for the ruling power elite. They might have to sell one of their 6 estates. Ron Paul would abolish the Federal Reserve and the IRS. The Federal Reserve is a secret organization controlled by bankers to enrich bankers and allow politicians to get re-elected by bribing their constituents with goodies. Our system is no more capitalist than that of the Soviet Union.

“A system of capitalism presumes sound money, not fiat money manipulated by a central bank. Capitalism cherishes voluntary contracts and interest rates that are determined by savings, not credit creation by a central bank.” – Ron Paul

True capitalism is the antithesis of what the power elite want. This kind of talk puts bankers and politicians into convulsions as their levers of power would be stripped away. Paul has stated: “I agree on getting rid of the IRS, but I want to replace it with nothing, not another tax.” The financially retarded pundits who question Paul’s stance can’t comprehend dismantling of the vast all encompassing Federal Government bureaucracy. They argue that the country would be plunged into Depression. What do they call what we are in today? Rather than conclude that the gig is up and that running up huge deficits in order to police the world and provide welfare benefits to the 50% of the population that does not pay income taxes, Obama and Bernanke have decided to double down. Their solution is to double the National Debt, greatly expand the welfare state, and continue to police the world. Does anyone really think it is going to work? Bankruptcy is a certainty.

“My observation is that whenever one person is found adequate to the discharge of a duty… it is worse executed by two persons, and scarcely done at all if three or more are employed therein.” – George Washington

That George Washington was quite a card. He truly understood how efficient our government would become in the next two centuries. When he occupied the position of President, the entire government consisted of a couple thousand workers. Today, the Federal government spends in excess of $3 TRILLION per year and employs in excess of 4 million drones. There are 140 million Americans employed today and 22 million of them work in government jobs. Nearly one in six working Americans is on the government payroll. Millions more are dependent upon the government to provide them welfare benefits, food stamps, insurance benefits, and pension benefits. Over 50% of Americans don’t pay income taxes. What is the likelihood that these leeches will be voting for candidates that propose sound money, low taxes, dramatically reduced domestic spending, and termination of our global empire?

There is the smell of revolution in the air. The mainstream media doesn’t get it. The 15 term Congressmen don’t get it. The doddering old fool Robert Byrd doesn’t get it. We’ve entered a twenty year crisis period that cycles through history every 80 years or so. The short-sighted non-thinking pundits actually think we are coming out of the crisis, when it has barely begun. The crisis period is always a time of pain, suffering and usually armed conflict. The details are unknown, but the broad outline is known. Existing institutions will be torn down. Many will die. Heroes will be required. The generations are moving into new life phases and their attitudes and beliefs will heavily influence the path of this crisis. Will we experience World War III? Will civil unrest and insurrection breakout in the U.S.? Will U.S. Troops be commanded to fire on U.S. citizens? Might they turn their guns on those giving the commands? This sounds extremely far-fetched. Yes it does. It sounds as far-fetched as someone telling Abraham Lincoln on April 12, 1861, as Fort Sumpter was being shelled, that 620,000 Americans would die in the next four years of Civil War. It sounds as farfetched as telling Herbert Hoover on October 24, 1929 that the stock market would crash 89% in the next 3 years, a Depression with unemployment reaching 25% would last 12 years, and a World War would ensue causing the deaths of 73 million people and ending with the detonation of two atomic bombs.

I’ve slowly come to the conclusion that the country cannot be put back on track using the ballot box. The entrenched special interests control all the levers of power. The Republican and Democratic parties are essentially interchangeable. They are controlled by the extreme right and left wings of their parties. The neo-cons on the right have no interest in balancing budgets or restraining government. They want to use the power of our immense military to remake the world in the image of the United States. They utilize the term “strategic interest” to rationalize any foreign military venture that suits them. A bunch of flea bitten rag heads in the most godforsaken country on earth are a threat in these people’s eyes. The left wing liberal welfare statists have never come across a program to redistribute wealth from the hard working middle class to the non-working shiftless, lazy uneducated masses, that they didn’t favor. The printing of money by the Federal Reserve, massive deficit spending and higher taxes support their agendas.

Ron Paul will never get elected President of the United States. His message is not sellable to the American public. It would require sacrifice, self discipline, living within your means, exhibiting humbleness in foreign policy, and following the Constitution of the United States. He will not be elected, but he can become the intellectual founding father of the new country that comes out on the other side of this crisis. His noble stand for the principles of the U.S. Constitution will lead us through the Second American Revolution. The Ron Paul inspired Campaign for Liberty is using grassroots efforts to get like minded citizens elected to local offices. This is a worthwhile effort, but I fear we don’t have enough time to acquire enough political power before the existing debt induced, corrupt system collapses under the weight of its lies and mismanagement. It will surprise many, just as the collapse of the Soviet Union came as a complete bombshell.

When the system collapses, no one knows what will happen. Do the frightened masses turn to a strong dictator, choosing safety and slavery over liberty and freedom? It is entirely possible. This is where those who believe in the Constitution can make our stand. We already have the document and the principles of government. We just need to adhere to and reinstitute them. Now is the time to join up with groups of like minded citizens. Meet regularly and discuss the real issues. Develop relationships with these people. When the shit hits the fan, they will be there to support you. Having like minded groups communicating in person and through the internet today could set the groundwork for the new country. Ideas are what drive revolutions. The collapse of the U.S. dollar is likely to be the trigger for the systematic collapse. It makes tremendous sense to be trading your future worthless pieces of paper for real money today. As the government sees the imminent collapse, they will become more desperate. Acquiring guns legally today is a good insurance policy for what might happen in the future.

The mainstream media will continue to ridicule those who fight for the Constitution. Ron Paul is just a man. He is no savior. It’s his ideas that matter. George Washington was just a man. He was a man who gave everything for his country. Are you ready to get out of your SUV and fight for the Constitution? The time is near at hand.

The time is near at hand which must determine whether Americans are to be free men or slaves. – George Washington


James Quinn at http://www.theburningplatform.com

FEMA is officially teaching that the Founding fathers of this nation were terrorists.  Listen to the video.

There is a vast difference between terrorists and a governmental entity (the thirteen states) who declared their separation from England.  The Framers were not terrorists but leaders of a nation whose citizens were being tyrannized by King George.  It is obvious the FEMA instructor in the video is either ignorant of history, radically left or Marxist.  You decide.

The Enlightened Before the Enlightenment.

By Gary DeMar, August 18, 2009

http://www.theamericanvision.org

Franklin was influenced by Cotton Mather’s Essays to do Good, “which perhaps gave me a turn of thinking that had an influence on some of the principal future events of my life.”[1] Franklin gives considerable attention to the issue of the moral life in his autobiography (not that he was always moral). He was particularly put off by a Presbyterian minister who preached on Philippians 4:8 but failed to plumb the depths of the passage:

At length he took for his text that verse of the fourth chapter of Philippians, “Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, honest, just, pure, lovely, or of good report, if there be any virtue, or any praise, think on these things.” And I imagin’d, in a sermon on such a text, we could not miss of having some morality. But he confin’d himself to five points only, as meant by the apostle, viz.: 1. Keeping holy the Sabbath day. 2. Being diligent in reading the holy Scriptures. 3. Attending duly the publick worship. 4. Partaking of the Sacrament. 5. Paying a due respect to God’s ministers. These might be all good things; but, as they were not the kind of good things that I expected from that text, I despaired of ever meeting with them from any other, was disgusted, and attended his preaching no more.

Philippians 4:8 is a good passage to ask the question “what constitutes the good and how do we account for it?” Certainly not by reason alone and certainly not by a worldview that discounts God entirely.

Mather was a Puritan minister who believed and taught “that the power and opportunity to do good, not only gives a right to the doing of it, but makes the doing of it a duty.” Mather saw good works as the reasonable outworking of faith. The Bible says as much: “faith without works is dead” (James 2:20, KJV). Mather’s influence on Franklin can be seen in the actual wording of Franklin’s Autobiography where he acknowledges belief in God and resultant good works: “I never doubted, for instance, the existence of the Deity; that he made the world, and govern’d it by his Providence; that the most acceptable service of God was the doing good to man; that our souls are immortal; and that all crime will be punished, and virtue reward, either here or hereafter.”[2] One of Franklin’s recent biographers writes:

Franklin’s belief that he could best serve God by serving his fellow man may strike some as mundane, but it was in truth a worthy creed that he deeply believed and faithfully followed.[3]

Many historians believe America was founded on the principles of the Enlightenment because of the emphasis on reason by a number of thinkers of that era. While it’s true that most Enlightenment thinkers elevated reason to the position of a secular god, reason, logic, and science were staple disciplines among early Christian thinkers that gave rise to science. “The language of Europe and America had as its common feature an emphasis on calm, rational discourse, but we must not confuse this with rationalism,”[4] the belief that reason alone was the basis for all knowledge. By the time Franklin came along, there had been a long history of scholarship in the colonies that rested on the foundation stones of Special Revelation, reasonable inquiry, and scientific investigation.

Harvard, founded in 1636 by Puritans, required that students be able “to resolve [the Scriptures] Logically.”[5] What was true of Scripture was also true of “natural philosophy,” politics, and every other area of life.[6] The Puritans despised an “illiterate ministry.” Ministers generally were the most educated men in the colonies and served as popular educators. “No other thinker had such a wide audience as did the preacher in his pulpit, and his printed sermons and treatises were the staple reading matter of his parishioners.”[7] When the preacher delivered his message, the community at large was impacted by it. “On Sundays, ministers would be gospel heralds proclaiming the way of personal salvation though faith in Christ.”[8] These same ministers would use weekdays, as the occasion required, to become “social guardians telling the nation who they were and what they must do to retain God’s special covenant interest.”[9] There was duty involved in the Christian life. Preaching on the reality of sin and the promise of redemption had a broader relevance. “Since all of society fell under the mastery of God’s Word, it was necessary that there be a provision for formal presentation of the Word at every significant event in the life of the community. More than any other custom or institution, the occasional sermon symbolized New England’s claim to peculiar peoplehood and proclaimed that in all events bearing on public life, God’s Word would be preeminent.”[10]

Reason was considered a tool, not the final arbiter of truth. Whose version of reason would be considered ultimately reasonable? No one could say. Even so, reason was valued and necessary because it was a reflection of God’s nature. The reason-alone approach was displayed in all its horrid consistency when the worst elements of the Enlightenment philosophers came full circle during the French Revolution. Heads rolled and blood flowed in the streets. America’s dance with the Enlightenment was held in check by the underlying tenets of Christianity.

Cotton Mather’s The Christian Philosopher (1721), the first systematic book on science published in America and based in part on Robert Boyle’s The Christian Virtuoso (1690),[11] stands as ample testimony to the use of reason by Christians long before Deists and infidels made exclusive claim to it. We shouldn’t forget that Mather was a forward thinking scientist who promoted inoculation for smallpox after hearing stories from African slaves and reading about success in Turkey in reports of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. It was a medical practitioner who opposed Mather and turned some clergymen against him. And it didn’t help that Benjamin Franklin’s brother, James, incited hostility to Mather through his new weekly newspaper the New England Courant. Because of James Franklin’s published anti-inoculation efforts, an incendiary device was thrown into Mather’s house.[12] Benjamin Franklin took a position different from that of his brother:

[Benjamin Franklin] later became a fervent advocate of inoculation, painfully and poignantly espousing the cause right after his 4-year-old son, Francis, died of the pox in 1736. And he would, both as an aspiring boy of letters, end up becoming Cotton Mather’s admirer and, a few years later, his acquaintance.[13]

Mather also experimented with plant hybridization. The publication of his Curiosa Americana (1712–1724) won him membership in the Royal Society of London. Mather wrote and published more than 400 works. “By the time Franklin was born, Cotton Mather had built a private library of almost three thousand volumes rich in classical and scientific as well as theological works. This appreciation of books was one of the traits shared by the Puritanism of Mather and the Enlightenment of [John] Locke,[14] worlds that would combine in the character of Benjamin Franklin.”[15]

For the record, it was Thomas Jefferson who received early training in Latin, Greek, and French from Reverend William Douglas, a Scottish clergyman. After his father’s death, Jefferson continued his education with the Reverend James Maury who ran a classical academy. When Alexander Hamilton entered King’s College (now Columbia University) in 1773, he was expected to have mastered Greek and Latin grammar. In addition, he had to read three orations from Cicero and Virgil’s Aeneid in the original Latin and be able to translate the first ten chapters of the Gospel of John from Greek into Latin. The ministers of that time were very enlightened when it came to the use of reason in their studies of God and nature and the pursuit of scientific investigation.

Endnotes:

[1] Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, ed. John Bigelow (Philadelphia: J.P. Lippincott & Co., 1868), 92.
[2]
Franklin, Autobiography, 211. Emphasis added.
[3] Walter Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin: An American Life (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003), 492.
[4]
Rousas J. Rushdoony, “The Myth of an American Enlightenment,” Journal of Christian Reconstruction, Symposium on Christianity and the American Revolution, ed. Gary North, 3:1 (Summer 1976), 670.
[5] Samuel Eliot Morison, Founding of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1935), 337.
[6] Leland Ryken, Worldly Saints: The Puritans As They Were (Grand Rapids, MI: Academie/Zondervan, 1986).
[7]
Richard B. Schlatter, The Social Ideas of Religious Leaders, 1660–1688 (New York: Octagon Books, [1940] 1971), v.
[8]
Harry S. Stout, The New England Soul: Preaching and Religious Culture in Colonial New England (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986), 27.
[9]
Stout, The New England Soul, 27.
[10] Stout, The New England Soul, 27.
[11] The use of Virtuoso by Boyle (1627–1691) has the meaning of “natural philosopher” or “naturalist,” what we would call today a scientist. In addition to The Christian Virtuoso, Boyle also wrote other works showing the relationship between the Christian faith, reason, and science: Of the High Veneration Man’s Intellect owes to God, peculiar for his Wisdom and Power (1684) and Discourse Of Things Above Reason, inquiring whether a Philosopher should admit there are any such (1681).
[12]
Laurence Farmer, “When Cotton Mather Fought the Smallpox,” American Heritage Magazine 8:5 (August 1957): http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/ah/1957/5/1957_5_40.shtml
[13] Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin, 24.
[14]
In addition to writing his two-volume work An Essay on Human Understanding, Locke wrote “The Reasonableness of Christianity” with “A Discourse on Miracles” and a part of “A Third Letter Concerning Toleration.” See Gary T. Amos, Defending the Declaration: How the Bible and Christianity Influenced the Writing of the Declaration of Independence (Brentwood, TN: Wolgemuth & Hyatt Publishers, 1989.
[15]
Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin, 24.

Were the Founders Deists?

Gary DeMar Jul 02, 2009

July 4th brings out the historical revisionists. One of the more kooky revisionist  claims is that our Founding Fathers were Deists. Deism is a philosophical belief system that claims that God exists but is not involved in the world. While God created all things and set the universe in motion, He is no longer involved in its operation. Given this definition of deism, which of the founding fathers were Deists? Which documents express the fundamental tenets of Deism? Official congressional documents, written before and after the drafting of the Declaration of Independence, mention Jesus Christ, sin, the need for forgiveness, and the justice of God. These are hardly Deist documents.

Benjamin Franklin was certainly no Deist based on his remarks at the Constitutional Convention. I don’t know how you get Deism out of “God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid?,” and “without His concurring aid, we shall succeed in this political building no better than the builders of Babel.” This is one of the most anti-Deistic statements ever made. The Declaration of Independence is hardly Deistic with phrase like “the Supreme Judge of the world” and “with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence.” The Deist argument is bogus.

But it’s Thomas Paine who is singled out as America’s true philosophical Deistic founder. Paine’s Common Sense did put forth arguments for independence from Great Britain, but how did Paine argue his case? What were his sources? Did he follow deistic lines of argumentation similar to those of the French revolutionaries? “He constructed his arguments from materials that were familiar to the average colonist, favoring allusions to popular history, nature, and scripture rather than Montesquieu, Tacitus, and Cicero.”[1] There is no hint of Deism in Common Sense.

A. J. Ayer remarks that “the first argument that Paine brings against the institution of kingship is scriptural.”[2]Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar’s’ is the scriptural doctrine of courts, yet it is no support of monarchical government, for the Jews at that time were without a king, and in a state of vassalage to the Romans.” Paine declared that “government by kings was first introduced into the world by the Heathens, from which the children of Israel copied the custom. . . . As the exalting of one man so greatly above the rest cannot be justified on the equal rights of nature, so neither can it be defended on the authority of scripture; for the will of the Almighty, as declared by Gideon and the prophet Samuel, expressly disapproves of government by kings. All anti-monarchical parts of scripture have been smoothly glossed over in monarchical governments, but they undoubtedly merit the attention of countries which have their governments yet to form. ‘

Paine has an extended discussion of Judges 8:22–23 where he describes “the King of Heaven” to be Israel’s “proper sovereign.” He then spends several pages quoting, discussing, and making application of the importance of 1 Samuel 8 to the then modern situation. He concludes this section of Common Sense with these words: “In short, monarchy and succession have laid (not this or that kingdom only) by the world in blood and ashes. ’Tis a form of government which the word of God bears testimony against, and blood will attend it.”

It’s the later Paine, the author of The Age of Reason, that secularists turn to in support of their claim that he was a Deist and an ardent critic of Christianity and organized religion in general. While Common Sense was written in 1776, The Age of Reason was published in early 1790, more than 15 years later and after the drafting of the Constitution in 1787. While Americans in general embraced Common Sense—“fifty-six editions had been printed and 150,000 copies sold by the end of 1776”[3]—there was no support for The Age of Reason by Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Rush, John Jay, and Benjamin Franklin:

As for the supposition that the other Founders embraced “The Age of Reason” or its mindset: Jefferson advised Paine never to publish the book. Benjamin Franklin, Paine’s patron and friend, gave his protégé the same advice. After reading a draft, Franklin noted: “He who spits against the wind spits in his own face. If men are wicked with religion, what would they be without it?”

* * * * *

John Adams, once a fan of Paine, having received his copy, called Paine a “blackguard”[4] who wrote out of the depths of “a malignant heart.” And Washington, previously one of Paine’s fiercest advocates, attacked Paine’s principles in his Farewell Address (without referring to his name)[5] as unpatriotic and subversive.[6]

Paine’s later views were so opposed by the public that he spent his last years in New York in relative obscurity. “Paine had expressed a wish to be buried in a Quaker cemetery, but the Society of Friends denied his request. In attendance at his graveside on his farm were his Quaker friend Wilbert Hicks, “Madame Bonneville, her son Benjamin, and two black men who wished to pay tribute to Paine for his efforts to put an end to slavery. It is probable that a few others persons were there but no one who officially represented either France or the United States.”[7] Stokes and Pfeffer, writing in Church and State in the United States, state that “For a long time Paine, notwithstanding his great contributions to the Revolutionary cause, was held low in American public opinion.”[8][9] of him at the time. Although Paine was not an atheist—he believed in God and immortality—the expression of his religious views in The Age of Reason put him outside the religious mainstream which was generally Christian. Theodore Roosevelt’s description of Thomas Paine “as a ‘filthy little atheist’ represented all too accurately the public estimate”

The Thomas Paine of Common Sense and the Thomas Paine of The Age of Reason must be kept separate, both by time and philosophy. The later Paine cannot be superimposed on the earlier Paine. Without Paine’s biblical arguments in Common Sense the book would have been studied with great suspicion and might have sunk without a trace. Mark A. Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, makes a similar argument:

If Paine’s Age of Reason (with its dismissive attitude toward the Old Testament) had been published before Common Sense (with its full deployment of Scripture in support of republican freedom), the quarrel with Britain may have taken a different course. It is also likely that the allegiance of traditional Christian believers to republican liberty might not have been so thoroughly cemented. And it is possible that the intimate relation between republican reasoning and trust in traditional Scripture, which became so important after the turn of the new century, would not have occurred as it did.[10]

The Blogsters who perpetuate the Deism myth are ignorant of history. They rarely read original source documents. They parrot the party line from notes they took in their freshman Western Civilization class by professors who haven’t read an original source document since they completed their doctorate.

Endnotes:

[1]Scott Liell, 46 Pages: Thomas Paine, Common Sense, and the Turning Point to American Independence
[2]A.J. Ayer, Thomas Paine (New York: Atheneum, 1988), 40. Ayer remarks that that his appeal to the Old Testament is curious “in view of the want of respect he was later to show for the Old Testament” (40).
[3]Ayer, Thomas Paine, 35
[4]
“The Christian religion is, above all the Religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern Times, the Religion of Wisdom, Virtue, Equity, and humanity, let the Blackguard [scoundrel] Paine say what he will; it is Resignation to God, it is Goodness itself to Man.” (John Adams, The Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L.H. Butterfield [Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1962], 3:233–234).
[5]“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports . . . And let us indulge with caution the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion . . . . Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail to the exclusion of religious principle.”
[6]Steve Farrell, “Paine’s Christianity”—Part 1: http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2003/9/4/212340.shtml
[7]Ayer, Thomas Paine, 180.
[8]Anson Phelps Stokes and Leo Pfeffer, Church and State in the United States, one-volume ed. (New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1964), 50
[9]Stokes and Pfeffer, Church and State in the United States, 50.
[10]
Mark A. Noll, America’s God: From Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), 84.

(Philadelphia Press, 2003), 20.

www.AmericanVision.org